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How Effective Is the World Bank at Targeting Sub-National Poverty in Africa ?

How Effective Is the World Bank at Targeting Sub-National Poverty in Africa ? A Foray into the Murky World of Geo-Coded Data

How efficiently is aid allocated to reduce poverty ? This question was explored over a decade ago in a paper by the economists Paul Collier and David Dollar. Their definition of a poverty-efficient allocation included, among other elements, the simple maxim that to maximize poverty reduction, “aid should be given to countries with large amounts of poverty.” When actual allocations were analyzed, it was shown that donor agencies paid heed to this rule. (Donors did less well at giving aid to countries with good policies, which, the authors argued, resulted in poverty-inefficient allocations overall.)

As part of its “Mapping for Results” initiative, the World Bank has geo-coded its entire project portfolio of 2,900 active projects across 30,400 sub-national locations in 144 countries. Meanwhile, IFPRI’s Harvest Choice initiative has gathered together sub-national poverty data (using the international poverty line of $1.25 a day) from recent household surveys in 24 sub-Saharan African countries to draw detailed poverty maps covering half the continent. Both datasets contain, at a minimum, information at the first-order administrative level, meaning the province, state and governorate.

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Source : Brookings

Publié le 23 mai 2013

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